BUCKEYE FURNACE CEMETERY
Buckeye Cemetery is located on the top of the hill past the company store and can be driven to by car. These recordings were made on October 19, 1988 by Ed and Helen Walker, and Virgil and Marguerite Ramsey.
Polly V Bacus, wife of John died July 13, 1857 age 62y 6m 3d

William C Brooks, son of J & M died Aug. 29, 1869 age 10m 20d
Armilda Soule, daughter of A & DK died Feb. 2, 1858 age 26y 1m 15d
Benjamin F Soule, son of  A & DK died Jan. 2 1859 age 23y 6m 20d
Ellen S Perkins, daughter of J & ME died July 17, 1865 age 3y 10m 12d
Catherine Lantz, daughter of C & C died Aug. 5, 1869 age 7m 10d
Edward N Lantz, son of GH & OJ died Sept. 14, 1878 age 8m 27d
James C Lantz, son of C & C died May 6, 1871 age 4y 8m 3d
William Lantz, Son of GH & OJ died Oct. 25, 1878 age 1y 1m 23d
Purlie Walburn, son of E & C died Sept. 28,1880 age 1y 5m 14d
Nora Knox, daughter of W & E died Oct 16, 1880 age 2y
Eliza Knox, wife of W Knox died Sept. 26,1881 age 27y 5m 7d
Elizabeth E Potts, wife of John died Sept. 29,1881 age 21y 6m 7d
The tombstones recorded are all that remain of the cemetery. There may have been more but there was no evidence of them at the time. Since the Walker-Ramsey recordings in 1988 many more of the stones have been lost or destroyed only 4 remain. Of the 13 tombstones recorded, 8 are for children under 5 years old and 2 of the adults died before being married. There are no adult tombstones between 1865 and 1880. There are no tombstones dated after 1881.
Buckeye Furnace closed in the 1894-95 but the church remained until the mid 1900s.
Park Hours:
June - October
Monday CLOSED
Tuesday CLOSED
Wednesday By appointment only
Thursday By appointment only
Friday By appointment only
Saturday 12:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 12:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
 Admission
OHS Members FREE
Adults: $4
Children 6-12 $3
Children 5 & under FREE
To visit Buckeye Furnace from Columbus, take State Route 35 south to Route 124 (also marked as 346). Travel east on Route 124 to County Road 58; go south on 58 to Township Road 167 and southwest to Buckeye Furnace. Directions to Buckeye Furnace are indicated by road signs. Set your GPS: Latitude: 39-02'15'' N Longitude: 082-27'35'' W 
    Buckeye furnace was built by Mr. Thomas Price in the year 1851, and was in blast almost continuously until about eleven years ago, when she went out of blast, and has remained so ever since, but for what reason we are unable to say.   
  Buckeye is now owned by the Superior Coal Co., the property being looked after by Mr. J. J. Mannering. The furnace is situated about twelve miles east of Jackson on a branch of the C. H. & D. R. R., and everything seems to indicate that a mistake has been made in allowing the old furnace to lay idle. Plenty of second growth timber can be had close to the furnace, and there is still plenty of iron ore and lime that can be had with but little expense in preparing for it, but indications now are that the old furnace will never again resume her former labors, that of making pig iron. - Jackson Sun. Found in Ironton Weekly Register, July 11, 1896

Buckeye Furnace Office and store

photo by Tyrone Hemry August 2011 

Jackson, OH covered Bridge #11 at Buckeye Furnace 

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Buckeye Furnace covered bridge #11

photo by Tyrone Hemry August 2011 

Buckeye Furnace is just one of the sixty-nine such furnaces that dotted the land in what was the Hanging Rock Iron Region.  Iron production ceased in 1916. Buckeye Furnace is one of only a few reconstructed furnace operations in the United States.  The Furnace complex was reconstructed in the early 1970s as a memorial to the charcoal iron industry once centered in southeastern Ohio and northern Kentucky.      Construction of Buckeye Furnace began in 1851 in Milton Township, Jackson County, built by the company of Hawkins, Daniels & Co. (HD & Co.). In addition to the furnace complex, they owned or leased several thousand acres of land with continuous stands of virgin timber, supplying the fuel when converted to charcoal. The surrounding hills contained easily mined iron ore that provided the  material that yielded a high grade of iron. In the Buckeye Furnace lands there was also limestone. This material provided "flux" (attracting impurities forming a paste on top of the molten iron in the production process).  The furnaces consumed staggering quantities of these raw materials. During one year's production, Buckeye Furnace required 12,000 cords of wood, 8,000 tons of iron ore and 400 tons of limestone.     At the of the furnace was a community of several hundred persons, where the workers and their families lived. The small town consisted of a general store, church, school, and graveyard. Occupations were classed as laborers, teamsters, ore-diggers, blacksmiths, carpenters, charcoal burners, storekeepers, bookkeeper, and furnace owner or manager. Wages were low and life was primitive. The $10 or $20 per month wage was paid in scrip to be used in the company store. Homes were furnished by the company and were usually dirt floor log cabins. The manager had a home of wood or brick.     The park is now operated by the Friends of Buckeye Furnace Inc.- The stone stack was all that remained on the land donated in the 1930s by the Frank Morrow family of nearby Wellston. It is currently owned by the Ohio Historical Society.
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Buckeye Furnace 1950's view 

Buckeye Furnace covered bridge #11

photo by Tyrone Hemry August 2011 

Buckeye Furnace

photo by Tyrone Hemry August 2011

Buckeye Furnace covered bridge #11

photo by Tyrone Hemry August 2011 

Orange Furnace Co., Jackson , Ohio script

     An example of script issued as pay to the workers. This one by the Orange Furnace Co. Workers had no choice but to spend it at the company store, because it was not recognized anywhere else, usually with inflated prices as the furnace companies didn't use regular money to pay their workers. Workers had to pay rent as well. In many cases, though a man worked 30 days out of 30 days, by the time he paid his monthly rent and bought the groceries and goods needed he was broke.

     To earn there script (pay)  the husband worked seven days a week from "can see to can't see". (In the latter years of furnace operations the work tine was reduced to six days a week.) The wife had the care of all other chores including seeing to the children, washing, sewing, cooking, overseeing the garden, and tending the livestock. All work at the furnace was heavy work. Injuries were frequent and men's life spans were short. In most cases the children went to the furnace school in their early years. In the case of boys, once they reached thirteen or fourteen they usually quit school and joined their fathers working at the furnace.

Buckeye Furnace, Jackson Co., OH 1851-1894